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Today β€” June 23rd 2018Your RSS feeds

James Gips, Who Extended Computer Use to the Disabled, Dies at 72

By NEIL GENZLINGER

He helped develop two technologies that allowed people who could not use a mouse to communicate with a computer, and thus with the world.

Yesterday β€” June 22nd 2018Your RSS feeds

James Gips, Who Extended Computer Use to the Disabled, Dies at 72

By NEIL GENZLINGER

He helped develop two technologies that allowed people who could not use a mouse to communicate with a computer, and thus with the world.

James Gips, Who Extended Computer Use to the Disabled, Dies at 72

By NEIL GENZLINGER

He helped develop two technologies that allowed people who could not use a mouse to communicate with a computer, and thus with the world.

Inside a Heist of American Chip Designs, as China Bids for Tech Power

By PAUL MOZUR

Micron, an American chip maker, says its designs were swiped to help a new Chinese plant. Washington sees a larger pattern, fueling tensions with Beijing.

Bits: The Week in Tech: Silicon Valley Gets Even More Political

By JACK NICAS

This week, tech companies weighed in on the separation of children from their migrant parents at the Mexico border. Here’s why tech has become more activist.

Tech Tip: Locked Out of Your iPhone? Here’s What to Do

By J. D. BIERSDORFER

Apple includes plenty of security features to protect your data, but if you forget your passcode and can’t unlock the phone, you can still regain control.

Op-Ed Columnist: The Fourth Great Awakening

By DAVID BROOKS

Parable-based religion has receded from the public square, replaced by heroic myth, and the competitive virtues it celebrates.

Inside a Heist of American Chip Designs, as China Bids for Tech Power

By PAUL MOZUR

Micron, an American chip maker, says its designs were swiped to help a new Chinese plant. Washington sees a larger pattern, fueling tensions with Beijing.

Before yesterdayYour RSS feeds

Algeria’s Answer to Cheating on School Exams: Turn Off the Internet

By NOUR YOUSSEF

After widespread electronic cheating, the government is cutting off internet access nationwide for at least an hour a day, while students take crucial exams.

When the Robot Doesn’t See Dark Skin

By JOY BUOLAMWINI

New technology using artificial intelligence is meant to take race and gender bias out of hiring, but it could backfire.

Supreme Court Widens Reach of Sales Taxes in E-Commerce

By ADAM LIPTAK, BEN CASSELMAN and JULIE CRESWELL

Departing from a 1992 decision, the justices said that even without a physical presence in a state, businesses can be required to collect taxes there.

Intel C.E.O. Brian Krzanich Resigns After Relationship With Employee

By DON CLARK

Mr. Krzanich, who resigned after violating Intel’s “non-fraternization policy,” will be replaced on an interim basis by the company’s chief financial officer.

How a Few People Took Equifax to Small Claims Court Over Its Data Breach and Won

By NIRAJ CHOKSHI

After 145 million Americans’ financial information was exposed last year, some of them won cases against the credit reporting agency in local courts.

Intel C.E.O. Brian Krzanich Resigns After Relationship With Employee

By DON CLARK

Mr. Krzanich, who resigned after violating Intel’s “non-fraternization policy,” will be replaced on an interim basis by the company’s chief financial officer.

Tech Tip: Moving On From Picasa

By J. D. BIERSDORFER

Google’s old picture-editing program has been retired, but other free desktop or browser-based programs might be able to fill the void.

State of the Art: How Tech Companies Conquered America’s Cities

By FARHAD MANJOO

Elon Musk is drilling tunnels, electric scooters command the sidewalks, and Amazon is throwing its weight around in Seattle. Welcome to the technocapitalist metropolis of the future.

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