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Yesterday β€” February 16th 2020Your RSS feeds
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A Former Owner of Newsweek Pleads Guilty in a Fraud Scheme

By Marc Tracy

A Manhattan investigation had led to charges against Etienne Uzac, who co-owned IBT Media, and another media executive.

Facebook Says Political Candidates Can Use Sponsored Memes

By Taylor Lorenz

Unlike campaign advertisements, the posts are not subject to advance review by Facebook, and the platform does not make money from them.

Why the N.Y.P.D. Subpoenaed a Reporter’s Twitter Feed

By Ali Watkins

The police used an antiterror law to demand information about who leaked crime scene photos that she posted to social media.

They Documented the Coronavirus Crisis in Wuhan. Then They Vanished.

By Vivian Wang

Two video bloggers whose dispatches from the heart of the outbreak showed fear, grief and dissatisfaction with the government have gone silent.

The Original Renegade

By Taylor Lorenz

A 14-year-old in Atlanta created one of the biggest dances on the internet. But nobody really knows that.

Snoop Dogg Apologizes After Criticizing Gayle King Over Kobe Bryant Questions

By Christine Hauser

“I should have handled it way different than that,” Snoop Dogg said on Instagram. Last week he unleashed an angry response to an interview that touched on a 2003 sexual assault accusation against Mr. Bryant.

What Happens When You Get Famous Off One Song?

By Amos Barshad

Tom Austin released a hit. Now what? We asked him — and Rebecca Black.

Privacy complaints skyrocket, watchdog says it needs more staff

By robin
The Dutch privacy watchdog Autoriteit Persoonsgegevens received nearly 28,000 complaints about privacy issues last year, a rise of 79% on...

Michael Bloomberg’s Campaign Suddenly Drops Memes Everywhere

By Taylor Lorenz

A campaign of sponsored content for the candidate flourished suddenly on Instagram. A new outfit, called Meme 2020, is behind it.

McClatchy, a Major U.S. Newspaper Chain, Files for Bankruptcy

By Katie Robertson and Marc Tracy

Under the plan, the private equity firm Chatham Asset Management would take over 30 newspapers nationwide, including The Sacramento Bee and The Miami Herald.

Playing on Kansas City Radio: Russian Propaganda

By Neil MacFarquhar

Radio Sputnik, a propaganda arm of the Russian government, began broadcasting on three Kansas City-area radio stations during prime drive time.

Michael Bloomberg’s Campaign Suddenly Drops Memes Everywhere

By Taylor Lorenz

A campaign of sponsored content for the candidate flourished suddenly on Instagram. A new outfit, called Meme 2020, is behind it.

Songs? Nah. 10k.Caash Is Making Whatever Comes Next.

By Jon Caramanica

The Dallas rapper found fame with viral dance moves. Now he’s slicing and dicing music into post-song creations ripe for TikTok and Triller.

ARD to drop SD satellite distribution in 2021 [UPDATE]

By JΓΆrn Krieger

German public broadcaster ARD will cease the satellite distribution of its TV channels in SD resolution on Astra (19.2° East) in January 2021.

The channels can then only be received in HD quality. Affected are Das Erste, tagesschau24, ONE and ARD-alpha. According to ARD, the shutdown will save the broadcaster considerable costs. In addition, the commission for the determination of the public TV and radio licence fee KEF has already announced that it will no longer provide funds for the SD satellite broadcasts.

Otherwise, ARD would have had to reallocate funds from other areas in order to continue SD distribution, which would then no longer have been available for the originally designated areas. Whether ARD’s regional channels and jointly operated public channels such as KI.KA, 3sat and Phoenix will follow suit or continue SD distribution is currently unclear. Notably, the SD switch-off decision only concerns satellite broadcasting, there are no changes on other distribution infrastructures.

Almost 80% of DTH satellite households in Germany already receive HDTV – and thus also the public broadcasters’ channels as they are unencrypted. However, the situation is different for commercial broadcasters, because the HD versions of their channels are encrypted and subject to a subscription fee. Just under 16% of DTH satellite households have decided to pay for reception of the advertising-financed free-TV channels in HD resolution. SD switch-off is therefore a long way off for the commercial broadcasters, otherwise there would be a risk of high losses in audience reach and thus a sharp decline in advertising revenues.

Mediengruppe RTL Deutschland recently extended its contract with Astra satellite operator SES for the unencrypted SD satellite distribution of its free-TV channels until 2024. Shortly afterwards, ProSiebenSat.1 also announced that it had signed a long-term contract with SES for the continuation of unencrypted SD distribution.

How difficult it is to convince viewers to pay for the HD versions of the commercial channels is shown by the withdrawal of M7 Group’s Diveo and Freenet TV Sat, offered by Media Broadcast. Both providers marketed RTL, Sat.1, ProSieben and other commercial channels in HD resolution to DTH satellite households in Germany. As it was the case before the two competitors entered the market, SES subsidiary HD+ is now once again the only platform offering the commercial free-TV channels in HD quality via satellite.

Update, February 13, 2020: ARTE has decided to join ARD and also to cease its SD distribution on Astra at the beginning of 2021. This was confirmed by Kemal Görgülü, Head of Technology at the German-French cultural channel, in an interview with German industry magazine InfoDigital. “We definitely do not see our future in the SD distribution of our signals any more and have already terminated this in France in October 2016,” said Görgülü. ZDF, on the other hand, is still hesitating. A ZDF spokeswoman told Broadband TV News that no decision has yet been made.

ARD to drop SD satellite distribution in 2021 [UPDATE]

By JΓΆrn Krieger

German public broadcaster ARD will cease the satellite distribution of its TV channels in SD resolution on Astra (19.2° East) in January 2021.

The channels can then only be received in HD quality. Affected are Das Erste, tagesschau24, ONE and ARD-alpha. According to ARD, the shutdown will save the broadcaster considerable costs. In addition, the commission for the determination of the public TV and radio licence fee KEF has already announced that it will no longer provide funds for the SD satellite broadcasts.

Otherwise, ARD would have had to reallocate funds from other areas in order to continue SD distribution, which would then no longer have been available for the originally designated areas. Whether ARD’s regional channels and jointly operated public channels such as KI.KA, 3sat and Phoenix will follow suit or continue SD distribution is currently unclear. Notably, the SD switch-off decision only concerns satellite broadcasting, there are no changes on other distribution infrastructures.

Almost 80% of DTH satellite households in Germany already receive HDTV – and thus also the public broadcasters’ channels as they are unencrypted. However, the situation is different for commercial broadcasters, because the HD versions of their channels are encrypted and subject to a subscription fee. Just under 16% of DTH satellite households have decided to pay for reception of the advertising-financed free-TV channels in HD resolution. SD switch-off is therefore a long way off for the commercial broadcasters, otherwise there would be a risk of high losses in audience reach and thus a sharp decline in advertising revenues.

Mediengruppe RTL Deutschland recently extended its contract with Astra satellite operator SES for the unencrypted SD satellite distribution of its free-TV channels until 2024. Shortly afterwards, ProSiebenSat.1 also announced that it had signed a long-term contract with SES for the continuation of unencrypted SD distribution.

How difficult it is to convince viewers to pay for the HD versions of the commercial channels is shown by the withdrawal of M7 Group’s Diveo and Freenet TV Sat, offered by Media Broadcast. Both providers marketed RTL, Sat.1, ProSieben and other commercial channels in HD resolution to DTH satellite households in Germany. As it was the case before the two competitors entered the market, SES subsidiary HD+ is now once again the only platform offering the commercial free-TV channels in HD quality via satellite.

Update, February 13, 2020: ARTE has decided to join ARD and also to cease its SD distribution on Astra at the beginning of 2021. This was confirmed by Kemal Görgülü, Head of Technology at the German-French cultural channel, in an interview with German industry magazine InfoDigital. “We definitely do not see our future in the SD distribution of our signals any more and have already terminated this in France in October 2016,” said Görgülü. ZDF, on the other hand, is still hesitating. A ZDF spokeswoman told Broadband TV News that no decision has yet been made.

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